Bread, silent word of a gesture of friendship

. Bread, which fundamentally unites men and for which they wage war .     The history of bread goes back at least 30,000 years. The first bread produced was probably cooked versions of a grain-paste, made from roasted and ground cereal grains and water, and may have been developed by accidental cooking or deliberate experimentationContinue reading “Bread, silent word of a gesture of friendship”

… zwei Gulden und sechsunddreißig Kreuzer …

. … Da nimm einen leeren Sack, denn du wirst was heimtragen. Da nimm meinen Stecken, denn es ist viel Schnee, und da nimm eine Laterne, denn der Pfad ist schlecht und die Stege sind vereist. Du mußt hinabgehen nach Langenwang … … Überall in den Häusern wurde gemetzgert, gebacken, gebraten, gekellert; ich beneidete die Leute nicht; ichContinue reading “… zwei Gulden und sechsunddreißig Kreuzer …”

He’s the little boy that Santa Claus forgot

. . This is a re-blog of a previous rant of mine. I just thought it appropriate since I was making Weihnachtsstollen just a couple of days ago. For me this is the beginning of the end of the year, and beginning of the festive season. .   He’s the little boy that Santa Claus forgot,Continue reading “He’s the little boy that Santa Claus forgot”

A ‘Kipferl’ … it was …

. The Kipferl, ancestor of the croissant, has been documented in Austria going back at least as far as the 13th century, in various shapes. The Kipferl can be made plain or with nut or other fillings (some consider the rugelach a form of Kipferl). The “birth” of the croissant itself – that is, its adaptationContinue reading “A ‘Kipferl’ … it was …”

the more sense it makes

. “Cooking is not a particularly difficult art, and the more you cook and learn about cooking, the more sense it makes. But like any art it requires practice and experience. The most important ingredient you can bring to it is love of cooking for its own sake.” Julia Child, Mastering the Art of French Cooking .Continue reading “the more sense it makes”

associated with a goblin …

. Pumpernickel is a very heavy, slightly sweet rye bread traditionally made with coarsely ground rye. It is often made with a combination of rye flour and whole rye berries. At one time it was traditional peasant fare, but largely during the 20th century various forms have become popular items of delicatessen. A folk etymologyContinue reading “associated with a goblin …”

and dish a special allure

. WHEN NIGHT FALLS OVER NEW ORLEANS, BEVERLY HILLS, BOSTON OR BEIRUT, THE EXCITEMENT, YOU PUT ON YOUR FINEST, GATHER YOUR POISE, WIT AND SOPHISTICATION ABOUT YOU AND VENTURE OUT, ONE OF THE BRIGHTEST LIGHTS IN THE BIG CITY THIS NIGHT. IN THE RESTAURANT, GLASSWARE TINKLES GENTLY, CONVERSATION SURGES AND LAPSES, AND SOFT LIGHTING LENDSContinue reading “and dish a special allure”

the little boy that santa claus forgot

. He’s the little boy that Santa Claus forgot, And goodness knows, he didn’t want a lot. He sent a note to Santa For some soldiers and a drum, It broke his little heart  When he found Santa hadn’t come. In the street he envies all those lucky boys, Then wanders home to last year’sContinue reading “the little boy that santa claus forgot”

who likes the rain ….

. Who Likes The Rain? 
“I,” said the duck. “I call it fun,
 For I have my red rubbers on; 
They make a little three-toed track, 
In the soft, cool mud, – quack! quack!”   
“I!” cried the dandelion. “I!
 My roots are thirsty, my buds are dry.” 
And she lifted a tousled yellow head
Continue reading “who likes the rain ….”

they are tall herbs, really, not trees ….

Banana is the common name for herbaceous plants of the genus Musa and for the fruit they produce. Bananas come in a variety of sizes and colors when ripe, including yellow, purple, and red. Almost all modern edible parthenocarpic bananas come from the two wild species – Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana. The scientific namesContinue reading “they are tall herbs, really, not trees ….”